Elementary Creative Arts

    Overview

    In our classes we help children not only create art, but appreciate art. Most approaches to art education are quite technical. They teach children about historical art movements or art techniques, perhaps something about the artist’s life.

    Our approach to art appreciation helps children experience art the way the artist intended it to be understood; whether it is a painting, a sculpture, a poem, music, or fine literature.

    Each work of art is carefully chosen, we select works that are inspiring, with relevant themes to the elementary child.

    Program Elements

    “Novels, stories, plays, and poems exist to bring us experience. Literature is used to step up intensity and increase our range of experiences. Literature is not only an aid to living, but a means of living.”

    Perrine, Sound and Sense (1st ed.)

    All children at our school learn how to read. And we hope that they can use this skill not just for practical applications like reading a manual, but also to bring great joy to their lives through literature.

    Literature is experience-based learning.

    A child may not be able to rescue a princess, but they can experience the heroic deeds of a very brave mouse in The Tale of Despereaux.

    A child may not ever have to stand up to a tyrannical owl, but they can discover what it means to discover the truth and stand up to evil through Poppy.

    A child may not be a spoiled princess, but they will see what it is like to be kind to others and create friendships through Lady Lollipop.

    “The first step is to stop treating the art as a history lesson that will fulfill your cultural obligation, and start expecting an experience you will want to lose yourself in.”

    Luc Travers, Touching the art

    When you’re reading a book, the author provides the words and your mind supplies the visual.

    When you’re reading a painting, the artist provides the image, and you provide the story.

    Students learn a series of playful and interactive techniques, from mimicking the pose a character is making to physically acting out a scene; from imagining what the characters are thinking and saying to imagining what happened just before (or just after) the scene.

    Children learn to observe fine details and personally connect with the piece. Have they ever felt the way this character feels? Have they ever been in a similar situation?

    “Poetry is a kind of language that says more and says it more intensely than does ordinary language.”

    Perrine, Sound and Sense (1st ed.)

    Like with other areas of art appreciation, the study of poetry isn’t merely a study of rhyme patterns, styles and techniques. When we read a poem, we help children dig into the deeper meaning that the author wanted to express.

    Writing poetry is a common follow-up work choice across all areas of the curriculum. Poems about botany, space, math, and history abound in the classroom!

    Everyday Music

    Children are exposed to the fundamentals of music on a daily basis through integrated materials and activities.

    Creative Arts Curriculum

    Handmade watercolor sketchbook

    Lower Elementary

    Sample Art Appreciation Works
    The Boyhood of Raleigh, John Millais
    Childhood Idyll, William Bouguereau
    The Astronomer by Candlelight, Gerrit Dou

    Art Context
    Art Movements
    Artist Biographies
    Study of the Artist’s Key Works
    Experimentation with Media

    Elements of Art
    Positive and Negative Line
    Shape and Form
    Color and Texture

    Drawing, Sketching, and Painting
    Connection to Geometric Plane Figures
    Connection to History and Arts
    Pencil and Graphite Watercolor Pencils and Paints

    Sculpture & Handwork
    Connection to Geometric Solids
    Connection to History and Arts
    Clay
    Collage
    Crochet, Knitting, and Weaving
    Bookmaking

    Singing & Pitch
    Singing with the Scale
    Performance: Memorized Songs

    Rhythm & Tone
    Clapping Rhythm
    Pattern Naming and Notation of Tone Bars

    Movement & Dynamic
    Body Awareness and Control
    Notation and Movement Accents
    Dynamics
    Tempo

    Montessori geometric stick material polygons
    Watercolor painting with handmade paints

    Upper Elementary

    Sample Art Appreciation Works
    The Rookie, Norman Rockwell
    The Painter’s First Work, Marcus Stone
    The Accident, William Geets
    David, Michelangelo
    Echo and Narcissus, John Waterhouse
    A Reading from Homer, Lawrence Alma-Tadema

    Art Context
    Art Movements
    Artist Biographies
    Study of the Artist’s Key Works
    Experimentation with Media
    Music Appreciation

    Principles of Design
    Visual Expression
    Engineering and Technology
    Balance and Unity Pattern
    Rhythm and Harmony
    Proportion
    Contrast and Emphasis

    Sculpture & Handwork
    Connection to Geometric Solids
    Connection to History and Arts
    Clay
    Printmaking
    Crochet, Knitting, and Weaving
    Bookmaking

    Rhythm & Beat
    Written Note Patterns
    Naming and Notation of Note Values
    Time Signatures
    Rests

    Reading & Writing Music
    Naming and Notation of Tone Bars
    Degrees of the Scale Intervals
    Sequence of Major Scales: Sharps and Flats
    Transposition of Simple Songs

    Movement & Dynamic
    Notation and Movement Accents
    Dynamics
    Tempo

    Education for life

    If you think Rhyme and Reason Academy would be a good fit for you and your family, then let’s start a conversation!