This program is in progress. I’m not sure when (or if) it will be done, but it will take years for it all to be well polished. I share this resource as-is without any guarantees. Perhaps when it’s done, I’ll publish them all together as a book.

Current Status (Spring 2024): I am developing and teaching a partial Cycle A, Ancient Greece through Renaissance.

The cycles repeat every three years, so no matter when a student joins your class they will still get the entire scope of history chronologically, and the guide doesn’t need to teach three strands of history at a time. Each year the stories are different and touch on a different “big idea” for that civilization. I’m targeting these stories for LE students. All differentiation should be in follow up work. Each unit takes one month, with 4-6 lessons per unit. Tie your language arts lessons (composition and grammar) to this content to get the most bang for your buck.

Elementary History Stories

Montessori Timeline of Life and Long Black Strip

Montessori Great Lessons

These lessons serve as an integrating framework for the entire Montessori elementary curriculum and as inspiration to the heights of human achievement.

I spend the first two months presenting these lessons and related “key lessons” before beginning in-depth history lessons.


Cycle A:

  • In Development

Cycle B:

  • In Development

Cycle C:

  • In Development
  • Map of Mesopotamia
  • Map of Ancient Egypt
  • One-Page Timeline for Mesopotamia
  • One-Page Timeline for Ancient Egypt
  • Icons for Timeline Notebook

Cycle A: Mesopotamia

  • In Development

Read Aloud: The Epic of Gilgamesh Picture Book Trilogy

Cycle B: Ancient Egypt

  • In Development

Cycle C: Ancient Egypt

  • In Development

Ancient Greece is important to us in many ways, but the most important thing that the Greeks passed onto us are an understanding of mathematics and science.


Cycle A: The Good Life

  • The City-States of Hellas
  • Greek Homes and Farms
  • Growing up in Sparta
    • Biography of Lycurgus
  • Growing up in Athens
    • Biography of Solon
  • The Olympic Games

Cycle B: Ideas Worth Fighting For

  • In Development
  • The Greco-Persian Wars
  • The Peloponnesian Wars
  • Alexander the Great

Cycle C: What the Greeks Gave Us

  • In Development
  • The Death of Socrates
  • Science: The Importance of Aristotle
  • Mathematics
  • Art
  • Map of Ancient Rome
  • One-Page Timeline
  • Icons for Timeline Notebook

Cycle A:

  • In Development

Cycle B: The Rights of Citizens

  • In Development

Cycle C:

  • In Development
  • Map
  • One-Page Timeline
  • Icons for Timeline Notebook
  • Read Aloud: King Arthur

Cycle A: The Crusades

  • In Development
  • William the Conqueror
  • Vikings
  • Muslim World

Cycle B: Feudalism

  • In Development
  • Knights
  • Robin Hood
  • Magna Carta

Cycle A: A Time of Loss

  • In Development
  • The Squashing Science
  • Art
  • The Printing Press
  • Map
  • One-Page Timeline
  • Icons for Timeline Notebook

Cycle A: Age of Discovery

  • In Development

Cycle B: Freedom and Prosperity

  • In Development

Cycle C: Rediscovery of Art & Science

  • In Development
  • Map
  • One-Page Timeline
  • Icons for Timeline Notebook

Cycle A:

  • In Development

Cycle B:

  • In Development

Cycle C:

  • In Development
  • Map
  • One-Page Timeline
  • Icons for Timeline Notebook

Cycle A: Colonies

  • In Development

Cycle B:

  • In Development

Cycle C: American Revolution

  • In Development

Differentiation Through Follow-Up Work

Teaching the high points of Western History in one year is a fast pace, possibly too fast. The only hope children have of gaining breadth and depth in these civilizations is that they will return to the topic next year, when they are older, wiser and more knowledgeable about history.

Students will complete this scope of Western History a maximum of six times in a mixed LE/UE class. What are all the ways that students can learn more each time? How can we as educators keep the topics fresh and interesting?

What do they need to know to be successful in Middle School and beyond?

Language Arts Follow-Up

Use these history lessons and stories to hang all of your language arts lessons off of. Need to practice sentence analysis? Generate sentences based on the Greeks you just studied. Want to practice poetry? Try writing a poem about a Galileo.


The Writing Revolution

Particularly, I believe that history is an important topic for practicing composition. Starting at the sentence level and moving to multi-paragraph compositions.

Vermeer The Astronomer

Art History & Art Appreciation

Upper El students, on their second time through a cycle, might enjoy studying art history for their follow up work.


Integrate with Other Montessori History Lessons

Use the existing lessons you have in your albums as follow-up work. Encourage deeper study and integrations with UE students.